TV SMITH


TV Smith rose to prominence in the first wave of British punk rock as singer and songwriter for the Adverts who, after frequent early appearances at the seminal Roxy club in London in 1977, gained cult success with the Stiff Records single "One Chord Wonders." This turned to notoriety when their next release, "Gary Gilmore's Eyes" thrust them into the upper reaches of the U.K. charts. A further single, “Not Time To Be 21” also entered the charts, and the band spent the rest of the year playing live, including major tours with The Damned and Iggy Pop. The album that followed in 1978, "Crossing the Red Sea with the Adverts" charted on its first week of release, and is considered to be one of the few genuine classics of the era.

The Adverts released one further album, “Cast Of Thousands,” before their split in 1979. Mercilessly slammed by the critics at the time, the album has recently found new favour, and was recently described by Mojo magazine as “the long lost punk album that rivals The Clash’s ‘London Calling,’"

TV went on to tour and record with TV Smith's Explorers, who achieved a hit with the single “Tomahawk Cruise.” When the band split, he spent a period away from the live circuit, writing and recording songs – among them “Lord’s Prayer” for Lords Of The New Church. He entered the live arena again in the late 1980’s, playing sporadic gigs with his band Cheap, before re-emerging as a solo artist in 1992 with the release of the acoustically-infused "March of the Giants” on the Cooking Vinyl label.

The nineties saw TV gigging relentlessly throughout Europe, as well as releasing two further solo albums, 1995's "Immortal Rich" - which came out in the U.S. on long-time fan Henry Rollins' label - and 1999's "Generation Y." In 2001 German chart-toppers Die Toten Hosen performed as TV's backing band to record "Useless," an album of re-recordings of classic TV Smith songs, which became his biggest selling album since The Adverts.

In 2002, an internet-only acoustic anti-war single “Not In My Name” released during the build-up to the Iraq invasion received more than 7,000 downloads. Since then, TV has continued to prove himself as one of the UK finest and most consistent songwriters with the release of “Not A Bad Day” (2003), and “Misinformation Overload” (2006).
In 2007, to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of The Adverts, TV put together a band called The Bored Teenagers to play a sold out performance of “Crossing The Red Sea With The Adverts” at London’s historic 100 Club. A CD and DVD was released of the concert, and the band went on to play a number of festivals through Europe, including a triumphant main stage appearance at the annual Rebellion punk festival.

A new studio album “In The Arms Of My Enemy” was released on the Boss Tuneage label in 2008 to critical acclaim: 

“This punk survivor should be embraced, celebrated and added to the compulsory listening list of any self respecting music fan in the country. More than a mere collection of songs, ‘In The Arms Of My Enemy’ possesses that rare quality of genuinely capturing a mood and a feeling of a nation. This album is a real triumph for honest, heartfelt and informed song-writing.”  Sonic Dice 

“Officially a Damn Good Thing.” Subba-culcha

“The songs snap along with catchiness injected into every riff: a protest record that reveals a raging flame within its creator.” Record Collector

A great punk album,” Pennyblack

TV’s latest album, released at the request of his fans, is a double live CD of a recent solo concert in Germany featuring the entire one hour fifty minute set. Selling for the price of a single CD, “TV Smith live at the NVA” is available on Boss Tuneage from October 2009. 

Meanwhile, TV continues to tour the world, bringing his epic solo show to ever-increasing audiences. He plays more than 100 gigs a year, and has recently performed in the USA, Australia, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Lithuania, Poland, the Czech Republic and of course the UK, where he was recently invited to play support on major tours by artists as diverse as Dead Men Walking and Toy Dolls. His on the road experiences have been documented in two books of tour diaries published by Arima: Volume One, “Getting There,” and Volume Two, “How To Feel Human.”

A full length documentary of TV Smith, covering his time with The Adverts and his subsequent solo career was recently shown on BBC 3 as part of “Punk Britannia”.

Latest news, archives, and photos can be found at: www.tvsmith.com
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